Pura Belpre

Pura Belpre was a legend in education and literacy. She pioneered bilingual education, theater, book mobile, and so many more projects in Harlem. I drew her as part of the 2016 series “Who is She?” for Women’s history month. More info.

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Marley Dias

This was drawn this year as yet another piece for my series celebrating women called “Who is She?”. This young lady is Marley Dias. She was fed up with the lack of diversity in the books around her, so she did something about it. More…

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Emily Pilloton

Emily is an architect/designer from the Bay Area who founded a non profit organization teaching building, design, and architecture to young people. This was drawn as part of a series called “Who is She” for Women’s history month. More info.

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Keiko Fukuda

Keiko was the highest ranking woman in Judo. She was one of many women I drew this year for a series called “Who is She?” for women’s history month. More info.

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Gaspar Yanga

Gaspar or “El Yanga” was a maroon who fought back against slavery and colonization in Veracruz Mexico. He is an Afro-Latino, Blaxican, or Lati-Negro. Mas aqui.

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Blake Brockington

Blake was a trans teen activist I painted for the 2016 “Black is Beautiful” series celebrating Black History Month in 2016. More info.

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Steve Muhammad

Steve Muhammad is a martial artist who founded the Black Karate Foundation, he is another person I painted for the 2016 series “Black is Beautiful” celebrating Black History Month. See more here.

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Toni Stone

Toni Stone was the first woman to play professional baseball in the Negro Leagues and this image was created as part of a series of illustrations for Black History Month entitled “Black is Beautiful”. See more here. 

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John Trudell

I first heard John Trudell talking on a cassette tape in my cousin’s car driving through Berkeley. Later I would come to find out about his involvement with the occupation of Alcatraz, and the American Indian Movement. At a time when Americans loved to romanticize…

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Ramona Africa

Ramona is one of the only surviving children of the organization known as Move in Philadelphia. Their house was bombed by the Philly Police Department on orders from the top. Their organization promoted social justice, living with land, home schooling, and they challenged the city of…

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