latinxs Tag

Inktober 2018 – Brown Berets

Founded in the 1960s, the Brown Berets are a community founded organization from California who organized around issues such as farmer workers rights with UFW, in solidarity w/ African Americans against police brutality, for access to education, retrieving stolen land, and to gain political power . Inspired by the Black Panther Party (Oakland) they formed a unit if mostly Mexican American high school and college students. They’re part in the movement for Brown people’s rights was in response to decades and hundreds of years of theft, murder, exploitation, and more by police, the US government, and by their local city officials who would of loved to sweep their righteous demands under the rug. The group still exists and were extremely powerful in organizing Brown people and for calling folks trying to deny their African and Indigenous blood (in order to look and be more white) to be proud of their heritage and identity. Their work moved beyond the voting ballot and they still work for the people today.

Sources:
Chicano! Documentary, Wiki, Life,
If you dig this check out: Berta CaceresĀ 

Inktober 5 – Amanda Alvear

Keep dancing.  Rest in peace Amanda Alvear- I imagined you swinging your arms and legs wildly to the music. 
This goes out to all the family members who lost a loved one to this summer’s tragedy at a sanctuary for dance, music, love and life. My heart goes out to you and all those who’ve been bullied or hurt physically or mentally by a society who does not truly understand who you are. I can’t say that I truly understand, but I can say that I see you and I support your right to love and to dance without fear. When starting my residency with Mobilize the Immigrant Vote, during a morning exercise I was handed three names of people who passed away and I’m drawing an imagined vision of those three people. Keep dancing.

Want this original drawing? $60 or Print? $20 (includes shipping)  
Got an idea for an org to donate 30% cost to? Email me info@robdontstop.com

Inktober 4 – Christopher Joseph Sanfeliz

Keep dancing. This goes out to all the family members who lost a loved one to this summer’s tragedy at a sanctuary for dance, music, love and life. My heart goes out to you and all those who’ve been bullied or hurt physically or mentally by a society who does not truly understand who you are. I can’t say that I truly understand, but I can say that I see you and I support your right to love and to dance without fear. 
When starting my residency with Mobilize the Immigrant Vote, during a morning exercise I was handed three names of people who passed away and I’m drawing an imagined vision of those three people. Rest in peace Christopher Joseph Sanfeliz- I imagined you grooving to the beat. Keep dancing.

Character 115 – Ana Delgado (Stand and Deliver)

I loved Ana’s character in the film. She was so quiet and seemed to be showing only the tip of the iceberg when it came to her personality. Working in her family’s restaurant and not expected to do anything more than what her parents did before her; she rises to the occasion in Jaime Escalante’s calculus class. Ana is a character from a late 80s a film called “Stand and Deliver” that gave me a gift. As a child watching this film I recognized some of the characters, but didn’t know so many of them.  This is a rare portrait of latinos in East LA at the time. In Hollywood films Latinos were and still are tropes, stereotypes, and tired shells of characters if they are seen at all. Most of the time Raza are invisible in film, but in “Stand and Deliver” we get to see a variety of nuance, layer, and subtlety because the teens in Mr. Jaime Escalante’s class were not one type. They were jocks, nerds, princesses, rockers, thugs, students, and kids who could not be categorized. If you have never seen the film, or if you haven’t seen it since you were a kid I recommend re-watching it. The genius portrayal of a Bolivian math teacher who challenged and inspired a generation. The effects of his work to teach algebra than calculus are still being felt. 


Did you see my version of Jaime Escalante?

Character 114 – Angel (Stand and Deliver)

Whats “Cal-Culus” ? This character is “Angel” who is not what he seems. You might see thug or cholo, and that is part of his character. But in the film we get to see so much more of who he is. In the late 80s a film called “Stand and Deliver” gave me a gift. As a child watching this film I recognized some of the characters, but didn’t know so many of them.  This is a rare portrait of latinos in East LA at the time. In Hollywood films Latinos were and still are tropes, stereotypes, and tired shells of characters if they are seen at all. Most of the time Raza are invisible in film, but in “Stand and Deliver” we get to see a variety of nuance, layer, and subtlety because the teens in Mr. Jaime Escalante’s class were not one type. They were jocks, nerds, princesses, rockers, thugs, students, and kids who could not be categorized. If you have never seen the film, or if you haven’t seen it since you were a kid I recommend re-watching it. The genius portrayal of a Bolivian math teacher who challenged and inspired a generation. The effects of his work to teach algebra than calculus are still being felt. 
Did you see my version of Ana Delgado?

Who is She? 13 – Antonia Hernandez

Antonia Hernandez is an attorney based in Los Angeles who now runs the California Community Foundation. She is the daughter of Mexican immigrants from Coahuila, Mexico. She graduate from Garfield high school in East LA, and went on to get her law degree from UCLA in 1971. She quickly began using her degree to fight for the rights of Latinxs in East Los. I found out about her through the ground breaking documentary “No Mas Bebes” about Mexican mothers who were sterilized against their will or without their knowledge. Antonia with several of the women who were victims of this practice sued in a landmark case that would make it illegal to perform such activites without a bilingual representative and the documents in the mothers native language. Later Antonia would become a part of MALDEF-the Mexican American Legal Defense and Education Fund. There she would work over 20 years fighting for immigration, language, voting, and healthcare rights for Latinxs nationally. From an early age she was involved in boycotts for the UFW and attended many protests. She is a fighter and has been awarded many times for her work.

Sources: CalFund.org (site), Prof.chicanas.com/ (site)