people of color Tag

Postcard Deal 2

 

Here is a second set of postcards. You know, some folks still send snail mail and dig these. If you are one of those people you can cop this set HERE.
This set has a mix of artwork with the themes of analog music, character design, self care, and people of color. The last set of postcards is here.

4th Annual “Social Justice Children’s Book Holiday Fair”

 

These are just some of the people organizing and/or reading at the 2020 virtual
“Social Justice Children’s Book Holiday Fair”
SNEAK PEEK: 2020 AUTHORS AND PRESENTERS! 📣

We’re finalizing Saturday’s program and wanted to give you a quick peek at a few of the incredible people who’ll be joining us this year:

Jesse Byrd – author of Sunny Days and Real Jungle Tales

Grace Carroll – author of Akira’s Animal Alphabet Alliterations and The First Ten Days

Michael Genhart – author of Accordionly and Rainbow: A First Book of Pride

Jill Guerra – author of When I Breathe Deeply and Long Hair Don’t Care

Lourdes Rivas – author of They Call Me Mix

Meera Sriram – author of A Gift for Amma and The Yellow Suitcase

Justine Villanueva – author of Jack and Agyu and Mama Mama Do You Know What I Like

Dr. Khalid White – author of Little Brother, Hermanita

More to come! 


Did you see the panel discussion some of the organizer recorded? Peep it HERE


POC POV Sticker

Here’s a clear vinyl sticker of an old favorite. First I made it as a small doodle for my sticker sheet. Then I blew it up as a larger painting. And now I’ve shrunk it down to a sticker again with a clear backing that you can put on just about anything. “POC” means people of color, and “POV” means “point of view”. Hopefully that is self explanatory.

If you want one cop it HERE.

Ethnic Studies in Every School

This is a print of a recent painting I made for the 16th anniversary art show of the “Trust Your Struggle Collective” in Sacramento California. I am a product of Ethnic Studies as I was able to take classes in it at Berkeley High School (California) and at San Francisco State University.


What is Ethnic Studies? To me, it is a chance to learn about history and cultural from a people of color perspective. Typically US and world history is Eurocentric and leaves out a tremendous amount of stories and history from Black, Indigenous Native Americans, Asians, and Latin@s. I believe very strongly that every school from elementary school up to college should have mandatory ethnic studies classes to educate all students.


After being a student, I had the privilege to be a presenter as part of the Trust Your Struggle Collective in the late 2000’s Ethnic Studies Conferences held at SFSU.


Check out the close ups below! You want a print? Go here.


Did you take classes in Ethnic studies? If so comment with your experience.



3rd Annual Social Justice Children’s Book Holiday Fair

What up family, this is the third year we’ve done the “Social Justice Children’s Bk Holiday Fair” and the venue, date, and some of the guests are above. Please bring your children, families, teachers, librarians, friends, and activists to come meet some of these kids bk makers and hang out. The following is a list of some of the authors that will be present!
Laura Atkins
John Casselberry
Madeline Connor
Angela Dalton
Michael Genhart
Maya Gonzalez- Reflection Press
Daria Leavitt
Kamaria Lofton-Like The Moon
Janine Macbeth-Blood Orange Press
Innosanto Nagara
Beth Reichmuth
Lourdes Rivas
Matthew Smith-Reflection Press
Justine Villanueva- Sawaga River press
Khalid White
Here is the facebook event LINK please rsvp and share, share, share!
This year we’re back at Chapter 510 in Oakland.

POC POV

This is an typographic painting I made awhile ago as a sticker first and now as a full fledged painting. POC stands for “people or person of color” and POV stands for “point of view”. So it means people of color point of view. I painted this on cold press watercolor paper with gouache paint. This is all painted and drawn by by hand. 

Why? In popular media and history the POV of people of color has often been left out, ignored , forgotten, misquoted, misrepresented, or overshadowed. This initially was created to help librarians label books by authors of color but I believe it can apply in academic, professional, or home environments. Not only that, but I believe it can lead to some tough conversations about race, identity, and white supremacy.

Character Collage (6) 2016-2017

Here is my annual collage of character’s I’ve either designed or reimagined both with traditional and digital means. My main goal with these when I started 8 years ago was to practice working on figures and faces. More specifically I wanted to create a body of work that could be applied to children’s books, gaming, comics, animation, film, and more. I wanted to explore figures from the past, people of color, ethnic studies, activists, science fiction, and fantasy. Let me know what you think!
1. EZLN– Ejercito Zapatista de Liberacíon Nacional 2. Cyclops-Xmen 3. Kamala Khan-Marvel character 4. Bobby Hundreds-Fashion design 5. Side plank – Yoga Pose 6. Repeal the Jones Act-boricuas 7. Sara KhoshJamal Fekri– Martial artist 8. Mary “Butchie” Tom– Dancer 9.  Bgirl Terra 10. Trayvon Martin 11. Lumad Youth-Philippines 12. Memphis Minnie-Blues 13. Frosty Freeze-Bboy 14. Vicki Manalo-Draves -Diving 15. Edna Lewis -chef 16. Mena
You can see the previous years here too: 
If you are interested in more information about any of the characters in particular, or a print just email me at info@robdontstop.com

Character Collage (5) 2015-2016

I love drawing realistic and exaggerated characters. Especially people who are not often drawn! I started doing these character collages as a way to practice and challenge myself over 5 years ago.  I’ve been into drawing characters for ever. Once a month, 10 a year, doesn’t really matter, its more about practicing and getting the ideas out. And by doing that, looking back and seeing improvement and growth. Top to bottom, left to right: 1. Toni Stone 2. Duke Kahanamoku 3. Sha Rock 4. Sketch soldier 5. Sho-Nuff 6. Ana Delgado 7. Ameena 8. Flyers ink drawing 9. East Bay Dragons 10. Lauryn Hill 11. Random sketch 12. Haenyo 13. Green Turtle 14. Marley Dias 15. Black hair Ink drawing 16. Ibeyi twins 17. Katara & Toph 
You can see the previous years here too: 2014-2015
If you are interested in more information about any of the characters in particular, just email me at info@robdontstop.com

Inktober 5- Ava DuVernay

This is an Inktober drawing of film maker Ava DuVernay using brush, ink, a little bit of water color, and some white pastel. The reason I’m drawing Ava is because she has been a tremendous creative influence on me. Both her work in creating and promoting films has been humble, tough, creative, and incredible. And although I only became aware of her once she did the Hip Hop documentary “This is the Life” about The Good Life Cafe in Leimert Park, I feel like I’ve watched watched her grow so much. I’m not going to give you her whole story, you can google that for yourself, but I will say her contributions to the medium of storytelling through film have been amazing. If you are not familiar with her film work, google her. If you are not familiar with Array/ Affirm distribution model for independent Black films, look that up too. I promise you will be inspired. Middle of Nowhere, The Door, , Vermont is for Lovers too, Venus Vs, and Selma are my favorite pieces of hers so far. Can’t wait to see what she does next whether it is quiet or loud.

Dig this? Check out this portrait of Kasi Lemmons

Inktober 4-Mira Nair

“My sort of mantra in life and in films is if we don’t tell our own stories, no one else will tell them
Mira Nair

Mira Nair is one of my biggest inspirations for storytelling. She has been working as a film director since the late 80s and has made countless narrative films from the perspective of a person of color. Why is that important? Because very often when films about people of color are made they are often made by white directors who either leave things out of the story, misinterpret, or completely ignore the poc story and put themselves at the heart of the narrative. Ever heard of “Dances with Wolves, The Last Samurai, The story of Steve Biko, even hip hop films like Electric Boogaloo? These films are often set in a community inhabited by Black and Brown folks but their story is not told.

Films like Mississippi Masala, The Namesake, Salaam Bombay, and The Reluctant Fundamentalist made by Mira tell stories from inside the lives of people of color that we as movie lovers rarely see, by a person of color.

One of the other reasons I am inspired by her is her work to share knowledge, her refusal to compromise her art, and her ability to move within and outside of Hollywood. Not only has she worked on films that focus on POC but she’s also worked with Hollywood to tell stories like Amelia Earnhart, which to me shows an openness to try all angles. And since the time of Salaam Bombay she has dedicated time, expertise, and money to teaching the craft of film making to people of color or helping to fund their education in someway. A good example is her film company Maisha Film Labs based in Uganda. If you havent seen her work, go check her out!

Want this Print? $20 (includes shipping)  
Got an idea for an org to donate 30% cost to? Email me info@robdontstop.com