hip hop culture Tag

Inspiring Artist – Jamel Shabazz

This is Jamel Shabazz, one of the illest photographers to hold a camera. He’s a former corrections officer and a portrait photographer who captured so many aspects of NYC, hip hop, and Black and Brown culture in the 80s. And he’s still shooting today. I’ve known about him since I saw his books

Doesn’t matter what genre you work in, check out Jamel’s work. Check out his books for free from your local library, unplug, and get into it. Peep some more below.

Here’s a recent interview he did w/ OG Black Thought.

Did you see the last inspiring artist I shared here? Peep Afu Chan

Flashback: Boombox

This is a really old piece I made of a boombox using watercolor when I was just learning it over 20 years ago. As I have been working on some recent music inspired pieces I wanted to share something I made in that same vein many years ago.

Here are some recent/old music inspired art you might of missed:
Roy Ayers Portrait
Andrew Ashong portrait
Drum print

Character Collage (7) 2017-2018

Here is my 7th annual collage of character’s, this time with some typography that I felt went with the feeling. For this year I wanted to go with a theme for once and might play with that again. The theme? Analog sound! I wanted to remember what it was like as a kid to listen to hip hop, soul, jazz, funk, etc. And I’m also thinking of young kids and parents trying to introduce their kids to music.
1. Digging– Young sis digging for 45’s 2. Youth Sound-Sis wearing the headphones 3. Walkman-Turn up the bass boost 4. Boombox-Tapes & the box 5. Play that Beat – type! 6. Percussion-Drum & banner 7. Headphones – meditate w/ sound 8. Listening– next to the record player 9.  VINYL Type 10. Dad’s – who dig 11. Stereo-Remember this? 12. Turn it up!-Type 13. Lyrics – still matter 14. Speakers -Paying dues 
You can see the previous years here too: 
If you are interested in more information about any of the characters or type in particular, or a print just email me at info@robdontstop.com

Inktober 6 – Breakbeat Lou

Lou Flores and Lenny Roberts are the creators and pioneers of “Ultimate Breakbeats” or UBB. When I was a kid the art on the covers attracted me and through them I got clues to what my mom used to say whenever I played a record she recognized. If it wasn’t for this man, so many dj’s wouldn’t know the fundamental and odd breaks that hip hop was founded upon. In fact many of the greatest hip hop records sampled Lou’s edits of old funk, rock, or soul songs to create their songs. Much love to you Lou! Lou is not only a collector, digger, but he also djs and made a resurgence in the public eye in the past 5-6 years. Follow @breakbeatlou . Your mom would be proud of you bro. Thx for your immense contribution to the culture. I still got mine! 


Sources: Youtube, Ultimate Breaks & Beats


Want this original drawing? $60 or Print? $20 (includes shipping)  

Got an idea for an org to donate 30% cost to? Email me info@robdontstop.com

Inktober 4 – Joe Conzo



Joe is one of the most OG photographers from the Bronx to document the early days of hip hop culture. It is proof from his photos too that Latinos have always been there since the foundation of mcing, djing, etc. Joe who for many years was a fire fighter, struggled w/addiction developed a love for photography as a teen and went to park jams, knew some of the pioneers personally so he got some up close photos, and was often taking shots of Salsa and Jazz musicians of the time. Besides photographing famous musicians, he also has lent his eye to social issues and his photos have been featured in books, films, documentaries, and countless articles. In many ways he showed there was love, creativity, and resilience among Black and Brown communities of NYC while the city was neglecting the people. Peep more at www.JoeConzo.com or follow him @joeconzo Respect Joe!! 


Sources: JoeConzo.com, Youtube


Want this original drawing? $60 or Print? $20 (includes shipping)  

Got an idea for an org to donate 30% cost to? Email me info@robdontstop.com

Inktober 21- Buddy Esquire


Hey, this man right here is Buddy Esquire, one of the illest artists to ever do artwork that both illustrated and supported a culture he was living in called “Hip Hop”. He was a writer first and then applied those skills to design. Him, Phase 2, and Eddie Ed were some of the best artists to have designer your show flyer back in the day in the BX and NYC. I’ve always gravitated to his work before I even knew who he was. It has impacted me in how I see design, style, and contrast. Any kind of artist can appreciate the work he put in for the culture, I just wish he got more love while he was a live and that I sought him out while living in NYC. Much love to his family, may he rest in peace.

Want this Print? $20 (includes shipping)  
Got an idea for an org to donate 30% cost to? Email me info@robdontstop.com