stand and deliver Tag

#tbt-Characters from “Stand and Deliver”

 

I loved the film Stand and Deliver as a kid and still think it’s a ground breaking film showing Raza of all kinds learning and studying mathematics. Instead of feeling foreign to math Jaime Escalante makes you feel like you were born to learn it. “You burros got math in your blood” Edward James Olmos says in the film. For a large group of Brown people who were kept out of high paying jobs, building generational wealth, and power by design-learning calculus was and still is revolutionary. It doesn’t solve everything by any means, but Jaime’s legacy lives on. Have you seen the film? Whats your fav part?

Check out these other characters: 

Ana Delgado– The Nerdy math wiz

Angel from Stand and Deliver played by Lou Diamond Philipps

Tito-rocker/ladies man
Wanna see my latest collage of characters? Check it out
My name is Robert Liu-Trujillo and I’m a kids bk author/illustrator from the Bay Area. Peace!
One more, here’s a sketch of Jaime Escalante

Character 116 – Tito (Stand and Deliver)

Tito was the coolest dude in Jaime Escalante’s class. I wondered what kind of a band he played in and what his character did on the weekends when not in school. Of course, he looks like he was in his twenties. Tito is a character from a late 80s a film called “Stand and Deliver” that gave me a gift. As a child watching this film I recognized some of the characters, but didn’t know so many of them.  This is a rare portrait of latinos in East LA at the time. In Hollywood films Latinos were and still are tropes, stereotypes, and tired shells of characters if they are seen at all. Most of the time Raza are invisible in film, but in “Stand and Deliver” we get to see a variety of nuance, layer, and subtlety because the teens in Mr. Jaime Escalante’s class were not one type. They were jocks, nerds, princesses, rockers, thugs, students, and kids who could not be categorized. If you have never seen the film, or if you haven’t seen it since you were a kid I recommend re-watching it. The genius portrayal of a Bolivian math teacher who challenged and inspired a generation. The effects of his work to teach algebra than calculus are still being felt. 

Did you see my version of Angel” from the film?

Character 115 – Ana Delgado (Stand and Deliver)

I loved Ana’s character in the film. She was so quiet and seemed to be showing only the tip of the iceberg when it came to her personality. Working in her family’s restaurant and not expected to do anything more than what her parents did before her; she rises to the occasion in Jaime Escalante’s calculus class. Ana is a character from a late 80s a film called “Stand and Deliver” that gave me a gift. As a child watching this film I recognized some of the characters, but didn’t know so many of them.  This is a rare portrait of latinos in East LA at the time. In Hollywood films Latinos were and still are tropes, stereotypes, and tired shells of characters if they are seen at all. Most of the time Raza are invisible in film, but in “Stand and Deliver” we get to see a variety of nuance, layer, and subtlety because the teens in Mr. Jaime Escalante’s class were not one type. They were jocks, nerds, princesses, rockers, thugs, students, and kids who could not be categorized. If you have never seen the film, or if you haven’t seen it since you were a kid I recommend re-watching it. The genius portrayal of a Bolivian math teacher who challenged and inspired a generation. The effects of his work to teach algebra than calculus are still being felt. 


Did you see my version of Jaime Escalante?

Character 114 – Angel (Stand and Deliver)

Whats “Cal-Culus” ? This character is “Angel” who is not what he seems. You might see thug or cholo, and that is part of his character. But in the film we get to see so much more of who he is. In the late 80s a film called “Stand and Deliver” gave me a gift. As a child watching this film I recognized some of the characters, but didn’t know so many of them.  This is a rare portrait of latinos in East LA at the time. In Hollywood films Latinos were and still are tropes, stereotypes, and tired shells of characters if they are seen at all. Most of the time Raza are invisible in film, but in “Stand and Deliver” we get to see a variety of nuance, layer, and subtlety because the teens in Mr. Jaime Escalante’s class were not one type. They were jocks, nerds, princesses, rockers, thugs, students, and kids who could not be categorized. If you have never seen the film, or if you haven’t seen it since you were a kid I recommend re-watching it. The genius portrayal of a Bolivian math teacher who challenged and inspired a generation. The effects of his work to teach algebra than calculus are still being felt. 
Did you see my version of Ana Delgado?